Execution Breakdown: Sales Team Sent to Trade Show with Defunct Email Address on Business Cards

What separates the winners from everyone else when it comes to successful business execution?

Credit: iStock

Attention to details, or put another way, making sure the operational nuts and bolts are in order. Plus, doing that with a customer-focused mindset that’s spread across the entire organization.

It’s not surprising, with so much emphasis on high-tech tools, that the basic “low tech” stuff that keeps the trains moving can be overlooked or even dismissed. Sometimes, the new tools are positioned in sexy wrapping paper and target (take advantage of?) those always looking for the next shiny new object. Of course, others offer real utility and have staying power.

To be clear, technology and related wow tools can provide amazing ways for marketers and business people to succeed in their jobs. For example, last month I attended a presentation on artificial intelligence and machine learning, geared as an introduction for marketers. Cool stuff and important to know more about that.

The basics aren’t sexy but get the right things done well!

Last week, I reconnected with a former colleague at an industry trade show. It was great seeing him and we exchanged contact info.

The next day I sent him a short note, using the email address on his business card. The message bounced back undeliverable. Strange. Fortunately, I located a second work email address on LinkedIn (we’re connected), and resent my note. Someone he met at the trade show would not have been able to do that.

He responded as follows: “Sorry, we just changed our email addresses and we don’t have new cards yet.” Then, prominently marked in bold red at the bottom of his message was the real “NEW EMAIL ADDRESS” to be used going forward.

I share this story to reinforce my message about the nuts and bolts required for best execution. Continue reading

Take Net Promoter to the Next Level. Ask For the Recommendation.

Think about this sales growth opportunity. Companies may calculate their Net Promoter Score, but how many actually ask the customer to take any action?

Rhino Shelf does. The North Carolina company sells DIY garage storage kits. I learned about them recently when assisting my brother install his system.

The product is excellent, and if you’re considering garage storage options and are handy with tools, it might be a good solution for you. (They also offer an installation option.)

This isn’t a product review, so let’s continue with the marketing commentary. Continue reading

Poor Integration and Sales Bombardment Equals Bad Customer Experience

It’s hard to create good customer experience when sales teams are not aligned and compete against themselves.

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When customer-facing personnel from the same organization, including across different divisions, are not integrated, customer experience is likely to suffer. It may go unrecognized, but eventually the ultimate one suffering is the company itself, with lost sales.

Poor integration, combined with lax management, can cause the classic “left hand, right hand what the heck is going on syndrome.” And the terrible question: Who’s managing the customer touchpoints?

Thanks to Cision and PR Newswire, I’m such a victim. Good news, though. It’s a mild case and I’ll be fine. Continue reading

Swedish Flooring Company Gives Away Flip-flops To Sell New Product

iStockphoto.com

Photo: iStock.

A Swedish flooring company demonstrates you can breathe new life into an old marketing tactic: sampling.

No, I’m not talking about carpet squares mounted on a board or a child’s toy-sized piece of wood floor.

Forbo Flooring Systems, working with agency Valentin&Byhr, figured out how to break-through to the architects who spec their products.  They created flip-flops made from the floor material, and packed it up in a gift box: Continue reading

Nissan Salesman Adds Bizarre Twist to Car Buying Ritual

My Dad and I had the most bizarre new car buying experience the other day.

IStockphoto.com

IStockphoto.com

The salesman repeatedly told us “I want you to leave here happy”  —  even though Dad politely communicated that he was not buying a car today.

Let me explain.

My father is in the market for a new SUV so I went with him to a local Nissan dealer.  He wanted to learn about the Pathfinder.

The process began normally.  First, we asked some questions and looked at cars and options.  Second, we did a test drive.  Third, we came back and sat at the desk.

Then the show began. Continue reading